6 Best Sigma Lenses for Canon Crop Sensor Cameras

Sigma Lenses for Canon Crop Sensor Cameras Image

Investing in high-quality glass should always be your number one priority for either full-frame or crop sensor cameras. As we are looking at the best Sigma lenses for Canon crop sensor cameras today, we have the full gamut of lenses to play with.

Sigma, just like the rest of the third-party lens-making brigade, produces highly-capable optics, which are viable alternatives to camera brand versions. This means, if you want to go all in with either a prime or zoom lens for your Canon cropped camera, there should be an option out there covering your wanted or needed focal lengths.

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1. Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC HSM Art

Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC HSM Art Image 2

With the whole range of Sigma lenses for Canon crop sensors to choose from, choosing an overall winner really depends on the subject matter you prefer to shoot. It’s a bit like asking someone which is the best brush to use to paint a picture. Usually, the answer is, it depends.

So, we have gone with the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC HSM Art, as it provides a near-standard view of 48mm, which can be used in a wide variety of scenarios. Being a prime lens, it obviously doesn’t have zoom ability, but you do gain in every other respect.

The 30mm f/1.4 DC HSM Art benefits from a fast and bright f/1.4 aperture, featuring an aspherical element and a super multi-layer coating to maintain image integrity. Sigma’s highly efficient hypersonic autofocus motor has also been included, which features full-time manual override. All the workings are wrapped around a thermally-stable composite material which, although not fully weatherproofed, can still take the rigors of everyday shooting.

2. Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Art

Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Art Image 1

Another great all-round lens is the Sigma 24-70mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Art, which provides a 38.4-112mm viewpoint on cropped sensor cameras. This viewpoint ranges from a standard view to the short telephoto zone, which is ideal for everything from landscapes to portrait work, covering the most useful of focal lengths.

As this is a zoom lens, it has a fair degree of glass contained within, which is why the thing weighs in at 1020g. Within the optical arrangement are three SLD and four aspherical elements, with a super multi-layer coating applied to each. A stabilization system has also been included, which goes a long way for handheld shooting.

This lens is wonderfully sharp even at f/2.8, providing rich color and definition, and is a viable alternative to Canon’s own version.

3. Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports

Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports Image

Some may argue that a lens such as the Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 DG OS HSM Sports is overkill on a crop sensor camera. I beg to differ, as cameras such as the Canon 7D Mark II are still highly capable of collecting sumptuous detail. This line comes out with a 112-320mm viewpoint on crop sensor cameras, making them good lenses for anything from portraits to wildlife shots.

Being a pro lens, it’s quite a behemoth at 1.8kg, with most of the weight going into the 24 elements arranged in 22 groups. The lens also features an 11-blade, rounded diaphragm for creamy, smooth bokeh. Plus, an image stabilization system with two modes, a focus limiter, and custom settings.

This is one of the better Sigma lenses for Canon crop sensors, as it’s been getting rave reviews all around for not just its sharpness, but also its highly-accurate image rendition, features, and cost-effective price.

4. Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art

Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art Image

To cover the wide-angle side of things, we have gone with the Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art, which covers a 28.8-56mm viewpoint on crop sensor cameras. Five SLD and four aspherical elements have been included, along with the prerequisite super multi-layer coating. Plus, a hypersonic autofocus motor for accurate focusing.

The lens also benefits from a wider-than-normal for a zoom f/1.8 aperture, which means it’s ideal for low-light shooting and also shallow depth of field shots. The wider aperture means shorter exposures for night time and architectural work, and you won’t be disappointed with how sharp this lens is throughout the focal range.

5. Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art

Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art Image 1

I couldn’t help myself with adding the Sigma 85mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art into the list. The 85mm focal length is usually chosen for portrait work, while on crop sensor cameras it provides a 136mm viewpoint, which some may prefer for this type of shot.

Optically, the lens is comprised of two SLD, an anomalous partial dispersion, and an aspherical element in its optical arrangement. The f/1.4 aperture also works wonderfully in low-light conditions and for attaining shallow depth of field shots. Although this lens is a heavyweight at 1.13 kg and is not exactly cheap, it’s an extremely good lens and an equal match at this focal length, compared to other third-party and, dare I say it, Canon, offerings.

6. Sigma 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM Contemporary (Budget Winner)

Sigma 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM Contemporary Image 1

As we have gone through the latest and greatest optics, the Sigma 18-200mm f/3.5-6.3 DC Macro OS HSM Contemporary serves as a more generalist lens, covering a wide range of 28.8-320mm on crop sensor cameras. The lens also features some tasty features in the form of image stabilization and a macro mode offering a 1:3 reproduction ratio.

To make sure all the light rays are kept in check, four SLD elements and a super multi-layer coating have been included. Plus, a zoom lock switch has been added to prevent the lens barrel from extending.

Although this lens has a variable aperture, it’s still reasonably good in relatively low-light conditions, thanks to the stabilization system. The sharpest images come from the wider angles, with only a touch of softness in the corners at the most telephoto end of the spectrum. The Sigma 18-200mm also works reasonably well as a macro shooter for occasional use.

Final Verdict on the Best Sigma Lenses for Canon Crop Sensor Cameras

Although we could have gone with a whole host of very affordable optics from Sigma, we decided to go with the highest quality glass. This may mean paying more for a lens, but there is a method to the madness, as you simply won’t be disappointed with the results.

Usually, crop sensor cameras are touted with basic kit lenses or middle-of-the-road optics. But from experience, it’s easy to outgrow these lenses, eventually ending up with the highest-quality versions.

The examples above may cost a little more than your average lens, but the results will be oh so worth it.

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